varia

Pictured above, Carlos Fuentes (born 11 November, 1928; died 15 May, 2012), in a photograph by Paulina Lavista, standing in front of the Aztec Sun Calendar, the Stone of the Sun, in the collection of the National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico City
Fuentes on the subject of death…
'Ideas are never fully realized.  At times they retract, hibernating like some beasts do, waiting for the most opportune moment to reappear,  Thought does not die.  It only bides its time.  The idea that seems dead in one time reappears in another.  The spirit does not die.  It moves.  It duplicates.  Sometimes it supplants, and even supplicates.  Disappeared, it is believed to be dead.  It reappears.  In reality, the spirit announces its presence in every word we utter.  There is not a single word that is not infused with memory and forgotten thoughts, imbued with dreams and failures.  And nevertheless there is not a single word that cannot conquer Death because there is not a single word that is not the carrier of imminent renewal.  The word fights Death because it is inseparable from it—stealing it, announcing it, inheriting it… . There is not a single word that is not the bearer of imminent resurrection.  Every word we utter simultaneously announces another word that we do not yet know because we have forgotten it and another word we do not know because we desire it.  The same thing happens with bodies, which are matter.  All matter contains the aura of what it was before as well as the aura of what it will be after it vanishes. For that reason we live in an age that is ours, but we are also ghosts of an older age, as well as the foreshadowing of an age that is yet to come.  Let us not lose sight of the promises that Death holds.'

—from This I Believe: An A to Z of a Life (2005)

Pictured above, Carlos Fuentes (born 11 November, 1928; died 15 May, 2012), in a photograph by Paulina Lavista, standing in front of the Aztec Sun Calendar, the Stone of the Sun, in the collection of the National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico City

Fuentes on the subject of death…

'Ideas are never fully realized.  At times they retract, hibernating like some beasts do, waiting for the most opportune moment to reappear,  Thought does not die.  It only bides its time.  The idea that seems dead in one time reappears in another.  The spirit does not die.  It moves.  It duplicates.  Sometimes it supplants, and even supplicates.  Disappeared, it is believed to be dead.  It reappears.  In reality, the spirit announces its presence in every word we utter.  There is not a single word that is not infused with memory and forgotten thoughts, imbued with dreams and failures.  And nevertheless there is not a single word that cannot conquer Death because there is not a single word that is not the carrier of imminent renewal.  The word fights Death because it is inseparable from it—stealing it, announcing it, inheriting it… . There is not a single word that is not the bearer of imminent resurrection.  Every word we utter simultaneously announces another word that we do not yet know because we have forgotten it and another word we do not know because we desire it.  The same thing happens with bodies, which are matter.  All matter contains the aura of what it was before as well as the aura of what it will be after it vanishes. For that reason we live in an age that is ours, but we are also ghosts of an older age, as well as the foreshadowing of an age that is yet to come.  Let us not lose sight of the promises that Death holds.'

—from This I Believe: An A to Z of a Life (2005)